Klymit Valves

We have several types of valves on our sleeping pads: push-pull valves, twist only valves flat valves and pump valves. There are two sizes of push-pull valves: most of our pads have the regular sizes push-pull valve which is found on our Static V and V2 (except the ones sold through Costco and Sam's Club, which have the twist only valve). The small push-pull valve is found on the Inertia Ozone pillow portion only.

Regular push-pull valve:  The top valve is in the closed position. Please note the two notches on the side of the valve, when the valve is closed and locked these two notches will line up. The bottom valve is in the open position, the notches are no longer lined up. The image on the right shows the valve inserted into the base which is welded to the fabric of the pad. The push-pull valve has two stopping positions when you push down on the valve: the first stops the air from escaping the pad while you take a breath, while the second stopping position is where you will be able to turn the cap a quarter turn clockwise to lock the valve closed.  The push-pull valve is compatible with our Blue Push-Pull Rapid Air Pump.

Klymit Push Pull Valve

 

Klymit Push Pull Valve Instructions



The twist only valves are used on our pillows, Cush and V Seat. They are also on the Static V  and V2 pads sold at Costco and Sam’s Club.  We do not have a Rapid Air Pump that is compatible with the twist only valve.

Klymit Twist Valve

The flat valve is a two-valve system: one inflate valve and a separate deflate valve.  The Green Flat Valve Rapid Air Pump is compatible with the flat valve which is found on the Double V, Hammock V and Static V Junior pads.  

Klymit Flat Valve

     

The pump valve below is on our Inertia line of pads (except the Inertia Ozone) and our Airframes inside our backpacks pads. The pump valve has three parts to it: the housing is cupped shaped and is the part closest to the pad - the pump valve sits in this housing. The pump bulb is a small squishy hand pump with a one-way valve on the end of it.

Klymit Pump Valve Breakdown


Push-Pull Valve Repairs 

  1. I.               Replacing or Resealing a Mouth Valve – This can be needed for various reasons, anything from a defective valve to being gummed up with dirt or broken.
    1. 1.    Inflate pad to high pressure, should feel like a mid to high stiff spring. Unless the valve is clearly broken, then skip to step 3.
    2. 2.    Dunk valve under water to see/double check where it is leaking from,
      1.  Quite a bit of air will get caught inside of the twist cap of the valve, flick the valve while underwater to rid the inside of bubbles
      2. Bubbles will consistently leak from either the top of the valve (valve is bad and will need to be replaced) or from between the base and the stem (Seal has failed and will need to be resealed). If it leaks from anywhere else, it will probably also need to be replaced.
    3. 3.    Remove mouth valve without damaging housing
      1.  Use pliers or channel locks to grip the stem of the valve
        1. Pull directly away from the base
        2. If the previous step did not cause the valve to pop out, then try:
  • Twisting the valve inside the housing
  • Pinching the housing with the pliers or channel locks until you hear a cracking sound. Work your way around the base of the valve doing this. This is breaking the sealant used to keep the valve in place
  • You can also try gripping the end of the mouth valve and pull from there. This will disassemble the valve piece by piece, so watch carefully as some pieces may fly as it comes apart
  1. If the mouth valve is still functional after your remove it, then dry it off and move to the next step. If not, then throw it away and find a replacement valve
  2. 4.    Use superglue (Loctite 498 if available, but any will work) to line the ridges on the stem of the valve
    1. Careful not to use too much as it may cause issues when you place it back into the product
    2. A small line of glue smeared across the bottom two ridges is usually adequate
    3. 5.    Insert valve into base and push it in until the bottom of the valve lines up with the bottom of the base
      1. Applying pressure when on a flat hard surface usually works best
    4. 6.    Let glue cure for 24 hours before inflating. Make sure the valve is right side up during glue cure so valve does not become glued closed.
    5. 7.    Inflate pad and let sit for 24 hours to check seal or to find any additional leaks
      1. If you discover the valve is leaking from the end and not around the edges, find a replacement and repeat from step 2


Troubleshooting a Spinning Stem on a Push-Pull Valve
The push-pull valves can come from the factory rather tight and it can be difficult to open and close the first few times,  once they are worked it becomes easy to use.  

There is a cylinder that is bonded to the pad fabric and a second cylinder (stem) that goes into the bonded cylinder, if it sounds like the seal has been broken in the valve, then the seal needs to be redone.  It can cause the valve stem to spin in its base making it difficult to open or close - it can also be the source of a slow leak. 

When the two notches on the side of the valve are close to each other and lined up the valve is closed and locked.  In order to open the valve, you will need to turn the top of the valve counterclockwise to unalign the two notches before pulling up on the valve - you will not be able to pull up on the valve until the two notches are unaligned. To close the valve you will need to push the top down to the second stopping position then turn the valve clockwise a quarter turn to lock. The first stopping position holds the air pressure temporarily so you can take a breath.

If the valve stem just spins in its base and you are unable to unalign the two notches, this indicates that the factory seal has been broken. You will need super glue to recreate the air tight seal between the stem of the valve and the base of the valve.  Please do not use another type of glue.  Super glue is removable in case the valve needs to be replaced.

Check this YouTube video  on how to repair/replace a push-pull valve. If you would prefer to have Klymit fix the issue, click here and create a warranty claim. 

Troubleshooting a Flat Valve
If the flat valve is leaking it may not be fully closed.  If it is closed and still leaking you'll need to submit a warranty claim here

Troubleshooting a Twist Only Valve
If the twist only valve is leaking it may not be fully closed. If it is closed and still leaking the pad will need to visit our warranty shop for repairs.

Troubleshooting a Pump Valve
If the leak from end of pump valve, clean out valve. For a broken valve, replacement is needed. Leak between base and housing or between housing and pump: recreate air tight seal. Leak from the pressure release button: replacement need. Debris inside the pump will cause this leak, here is a video guide to cleaning the valve. To recreate the Air Tight Seal use Loctite 498 or Super Glue Gel Instant Adhesive. If you need replacement Pump Valve parts please email support@klymit.com. To request Klymit to perform the repair/replacement please create a warranty here.


How to fix or replace a Pump Valve Leak

Leak from the end of the Stem

  1. Dunk the Valve underwater and make sure that it is absolutely leaking from the stem (consistent bubbles escaping from the end of the valve)
  2. take a long thin object (such as a nail) and insert it into the end of the stem in the center of the circle and remove the O-Ring (usually white, gray, or black) it is only .25 cm thick so don't go too deep
  3. Once the O-Ring is removed there should be a black ring visible underneath where the O-Ring was, insert your long thin object into the hole in the center of it and push to one side as you slowly pull it out of the stem. If your pad is inflated, it will come out much easier than if it is not. This rubber piece is what makes your pump functional so be careful not to puncture it.
  4. Once the Rubber piece is removed check the outside edges and look for hair, sand, woodchips or other objects sticking out of slits in the sides. Remove whatever objects are keeping the slits open and then wash out the inside as best you can to remove whatever sand or other objects may cause issues later. Slide fingers over the outside edges until slits are essentially invisible.
  5. Place rubber piece back into the valve stem, followed by the O-ring making sure that any bumps on the O-ring are up.
  6. Inflate Pad and check to make sure it is fixed, if it is still leaking from the stem, repeat from Part I step 1
  7. Dunk the Valve underwater and make sure that it is absolutely leaking from where the pump valve is connected to the housing (hold the valve so the button is sideways underwater, if bubbles are arising from between the valve and the housing away from the button go to step 2, if the bubbles are coming from the button go to Part I) be sure to shake out any air that may have gone down with the valve by tapping it till no more air is visible around the button or in the housing)
  8. If it is leaking from between the housing and the pump valve then take pliers to the end of the stem of the pump valve and rotate slightly inside of the housing to break seal at the bottom, a small cracking sound is normal as long as it is not super loud or make the valve instantly loose. Wiggle it side to side as you remove the valve from the housing.
  9. Once the valve is separated from the housing take superglue and coat the exterior of the insertion port, making sure that there is enough excess to seal the slight space between the insertion port and the housing, fill in any bubbles that may have been left from previous glue in, and have enough excess to squeeze out of the top to create a permanent O-Ring around the body of the valve as well close to the insertion port (you should not be able to see any glue after you insert it back into the housing)
  10. Insert the pump valve back into the housing, this may take a good bit of pressure to click it back into the housing, having direct pressure between the base of the housing inside of the pad and from the top of the stem pressing together is the best and easiest method. Using a clamp to press them together works quite well also, just be careful not to apply to much pressure and crack the valve.
  11. Let dry for 24 hours before inflating
  12. Inflate Pad and check to make sure it is fixed, if it is still leaking from between the housing and the pump valve, repeat from Part II step 1


Leak between the pump valve and the housing

  1. Dunk the Valve underwater and make sure that it is absolutely leaking from where the pump valve is connected to the housing (hold the valve so the button is sideways underwater, if bubbles are arising from between the valve and the housing away from the button go to step 2, if the bubbles are coming from the button go to Part I) be sure to shake out any air that may have gone down with the valve by tapping it till no more air is visible around the button or in the housing)
  2. If it is leaking from between the housing and the pump valve then take pliers to the end of the stem of the pump valve and rotate slightly inside of the housing to break seal at the bottom, a small cracking sound is normal as long as it is not super loud or make the valve instantly loose. Wiggle it side to side as you remove the valve from the housing.
  3. Once the valve is separated from the housing take superglue and coat the exterior of the insertion port, making sure that there is enough excess to seal the slight space between the insertion port and the housing, fill in any bubbles that may have been left from previous glue in, and have enough excess to squeeze out of the top to create a permanent O-Ring around the body of the valve as well close to the insertion port (you should not be able to see any glue after you insert it back into the housing)
  4. Insert the pump valve back into the housing, this may take a good bit of pressure to click it back into the housing, having direct pressure between the base of the housing inside of the pad and from the top of the stem pressing together is the best and easiest method. Using a clamp to press them together works quite well also, just be careful not to apply to much pressure and crack the valve.
  5. Let dry for 24 hours before inflating
  6. Inflate Pad and check to make sure it is fixed, if it is still leaking from between the housing and the pump valve, repeat from Part II step 1